How to Help Students Discuss Books with Their Peers

Book talks and text-based discussions are great ways to improve reading comprehension skills. This blog post from the Clutter-Free Classroom provides teachers with a way to help students take part in literature circles and peer book talks.

I find that the most challenging thing about getting kids talking about anything is getting them started. This seems like it is especially true with book talks. That's why I love this anchor chart. If a child picks one of these it should get the ball rolling and lead to some meaningful discussions.

This would also make a great bookmark.

Can you think of any other sentence starters you could include to get them talking about books?

Book talks and text-based discussions are great ways to improve reading comprehension skills. This blog post from the Clutter-Free Classroom provides teachers with a way to help students take part in literature circles and peer book talks.




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