6 Books Written for Kids that Teachers Should Read (and then use for Read Aloud or Literature Circles)

These 6 books were written for kids, but teachers will LOVE reading them in their spare time too. They are perfect for read aloud or book groups and literatures circles at the upper elementary level.

Teachers…tell me if you can relate.

Here’s how the end of every school year typically played out for me. I would count the seconds to summer vacation with jubilation. Sure I shed some annual tears as I said goodbye to the sweet kiddos who, after 179.5 days together, had become like family to me. But as soon as they boarded their buses I too would squeal out of that parking lot and begin my commute from school straight to those coveted lazy days of summer!

I would ceremoniously retire my teacher bag to the back of the closet and with much fanfare would put my beach bag in its place of prominence by the door. I would then fill the bag with sunscreen, a towel, my sunglasses, a water bottle….

…and at least one or two teaching books.

Because that is exactly how dorks like me…I mean passionate teachers like me…roll.

Nothing says “fun in the sun” quite like a highlighter and few chapters written by Fountas and Pinnell. I also own copies of (among others) Teach Like a Pirate and Comprehension Connections that have sand squished in between the pages as well.

So for those teachers out there who start thinking about going back to school the second one school year comes to an end, I bring you a list of six books that were written for kids, but that I think teachers should read.

Because summer should be the time for reading for fun and yet I know there is whole bunch of you out there who sit by the pool dreaming about how you are going to set up and decorate your classroom or thinking about which activities you’ll have your kids do during that first week of school. These books are a great compromise. 

You get to secretly enjoy the fun of planning literature circles and book clubs while onlookers and passersby envy the teacher who “gets her whole summer off.”

Each of these books were selected because they enable you to view things from a child's perspective. I found each to be a quick and enjoyable read and appreciated how they made me think about how students may view things. They would all be great for classroom use as well.

{Click on any of the bookcovers below for the Amazon affiliate link. It will take you to
 Amazon where you can read full descriptions and reviews of each of these books.}



Resources Mentioned in This Post:
And if you are one of those enthusiastic educators who looks forward to setting up your classroom each year then I welcome you to download my absolutely FREE Guide to Classroom Decor and toss it into your beach bag too. It’s 60+ pages full of tips and ideas to help you create a beautiful learning space on a budget. Below you will also find my favorite back to school activities as well as the interactive book marks I use as homework and the printable packets I use to make managing student book clubs super easy.



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By the way, if you are not already subscribed to The Clutter-Free Classroom newsletter I encourage you sign up. Subscribers receive weekly tips for organizing and managing a classroom as well as exclusive free printables. You can sign up here.


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