HOW TO IMPROVE STUDENT BEHAVIOR and EASILY COMMUNICATE WITH PARENTS DAILY

When you have a classroom with a handful or students who exhibit negative behavior consistently, it can be very challenging juggling modifying the behavior, documenting you behavior, and communicating the behavior.  At the same time, you are working hard to meet the needs of all your learners across disciplines.  It can be exhausting!  This blog post will help alleviate these problems so you can get back to teaching.

Are you looking for ways to improve positive student behavior and easily communicate with parents daily? Check out these behavior management and parent communication ideas from the Clutter Free Classroom including behavior plans, logs, charts, notes, forms, apps, sheets, tools, websites, and posts.

This blog post will…

  • suggest 5 ways to improve student behavior
  • recommend 5 easy ways to communicate student behavior to parents
  • explain how to implement a behavior log in your classroom


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5 Ways to Improve Student Behavior

  1. Maintain Consistent Expectations: Set clear expectations so that students not only know what is expected of them, but also the consequences for not aligning themselves with those expectations.
  2. Hold Students Accountable: Address students’ undesired behavior directly and quickly so that they can modify the behavior accordingly.  We definitely do not want undesirable habits to form.
  3. Communicate with Parents: By having open communication between the school and parents, the student will view the parents and school professionals as a team working to help him or her and will help them better understand the expectations.
  4. Collaborate with the Child’s Other Teachers: Make sure all of the adults who work with the student are on the same page.  This includes the paraprofessional who works with him, as well as the art teacher, speech pathologist, and special education case manager.  If the student has a behavior chart, then he or she must bring it with him or her throughout the school day.
  5. Utilize Intentional Seating Arrangements: Whether the student is on the rug or at their desk, surround this student with peers who can serve as role models.  These role models are peers who are independent and mature learners who consistently make good choices throughout the school day.


Check out this resource here!

5 Ways to Easily Communicate Student Behavior to Parents 

  1. Note in Folder: Jot down a quick note to families about positive behavior and stick it in their folder that goes home with them each day.
  2. Email: Send families a quick email at the end of the day sharing positive behavior or a minor behavior. In the email, invite them to give you a call or send you an email if they have any questions.
  3. Behavior Log: Use a daily behavior log with numbers that directly relate to your expectations. Each student has a monthly calendar in his or her communication folder. It’s located in a space that is easy to access and easy for parents to see. 
  4. Notebook: Use a composition notebook to jot down a quick overview of the student’s day.  You can also include some sort of scale measuring how the student did with their behavior goal that day (smiley faces, numbers, etc.).  A parent/guardian will sign the bottom of each page and send it back to school the following day.
  5. Phone Call: When a student exhibits a significant or concerning behavior, a school professional must call home.  Refer to your building’s policy’s about who calls home during specific instances.


Check out this resource here!

How to Implement a Behavior Log

If a child is not “meeting a classroom expectation,” quietly address it by verbally reminding him or her of the expectation that he or she is not following.  For example, “You are expected to be on task during independent work time.”  Then record the #7 on my whole-class chart.

If the behavior continues, say, “I reminded you that the expectation is to be on task during independent work. Let's add it to your calendar as a goal to work on.” Then circle the #7 on the chart which signifies that you will be recording it on his or her calendar.

If the same behavior continues throughout the day, add tally marks next to the number. This shows the parent what the child’s day looked like. In the event that a child exhibits repeated behaviors or demonstrates a behavior that is dangerous, destructive or considered to be "bully-like," they complete a goal sheet. The goal sheet communicates more about the incident to the family and most importantly it is in the child's words. This helps to eliminate the phone calls and emails that say "I want to hear his side of the story" or "__ says she didn't do anything wrong." It also helps to remind the child that we must all take ownership for our actions, but that we can all make positive choices.

Explain that since these are “expectations,” we don’t need to write on the calendar if they are doing what is expected. Don’t tie in extrinsic rewards because it is important for them to adhere to your established guidelines, not to earn a prize, but because that is what is expected of them as members of a learning community.

This system provides you with data. It allows you to analyze specific students. You can pull them aside, have quiet/private discussions and work with them to set behavior goals. It also provides the parents with a record of the day.


Check out this resource here!


Check out this resource here!

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Are you looking for ways to improve positive student behavior and easily communicate with parents daily? Check out these behavior management and parent communication ideas from the Clutter Free Classroom including behavior plans, logs, charts, notes, forms, apps, sheets, tools, websites, and posts.

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